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Guest Post

Guest Post: Mister Stevens, by W.K. Dwyer

The writing prompt in January’s Hop On Newsletter was “Don’t tell.” I’m pleased to publish here W.K. Dwyer’s response, a poem titled “Mister Stevens.” Do you remember Freshman English class?
 

Mister Stevens

by W.K. Dwyer

 
there was this thing you heard
in writing class. you remember—
first period, maybe, spent staring
eyelids half empty, like a subtle hint

Publishing Stories: Author Peter C. Diamond on Hybrid Publishing “Amplify Your Career and Life”

This month the Publishing Stories blog is a two-parter. In Part 1: Editing and Publishing, Peter C. Diamond recounts his experience finding an editor and a hybrid publisher for his motivational self-help book, Amplify Your Career and Life: 4 Steps to Evaluate, Assess, and Move Forward.
 

Guest Post: Remembrances, by Walter F. Curran

This week I am pleased to present the writing of Walter F. Curran, a novelist, poet, and, of all things, the mayor of Ocean View, Delaware. Curran submitted "Remembrances" in response to the writing prompt "Should you ever choose."   If you would like to receive writing prompts and a chance to be published on this blog, subscribe to The Hop On Newsletter. It's monthly and it's always jam-packed with timely and useful information about writing, editing, and publishing.   Remembrances by Walter F. Curran   You love me and have for forty-seven years. I love you and have for forty-eight years. It took me a year to convince you.   You are a pessimist. Not just “the glass is half empty” but a full blown “OMG the glass is cracked and leaking” sort of pessimist, a Roseanne Rosannadanna type of pessimist. A...

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Publishing Stories: Author Maureen C. Berry on Publishing “Salmon from Market to Plate”

Maureen C. Berry, author of the cookbook Salmon from Market to Plate, is the feature of this month’s Publishing Stories installment. In this post she tells her experience with a traditional publisher and the ultimate successes she found for her book.

 

My Flirtation with Traditional Publishing

by Maureen C. Berry

 
You write and polish the best manuscript you can. You hire an editor. You research and then query an agent (or ten). Then wait. While you wait, you wring your hands, fret over that last phrase, that one word.
 
salmon-cover-200Should I have written more? Less? Did I seem needy? Will they like my work? OMG, did I include my phone number? I suck! What if I never hear from any of the agents? Should I self-publish? Traditional publishing is overrated. I will not self-publish, I’ll wait until I hear back. (Checks email every two minutes.) A rejection letter is better than nothing, right? A badge of honor. Surely someone will love my book.

Publishing Stories: Author W.K. Dwyer on Self-Publishing “The Killing Flower”

Welcome to the second installment of Publishing Stories, a new series from The POP Newsletter in which former POP Editorial Services clients offer publishing lessons for new authors. Today W.K. Dwyer shares his experience in publishing his newly released social science fiction novel, The Killing Flower.     Publishing a Book I Can Stand Behind   by W.K. Dwyer   In mid-October of 2016 I launched my debut novel, The Killing Flower. After more than seven years of writing, followed by two full years of editing, I held a launch party in DC, during which I referred to self-publishing as a misnomer, giving huge credit to the outstanding team I’d worked with, without whom I never would have completed my novel. Now that I’m on the other side, I want to share some of the details of this...

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Publishing Stories: Author Gary Bargatze on Self-Publishing “Your Winding Daybreak Ways”

In Publishing Stories, a new series from The POP Newsletter, I have asked former clients to share their publishing experience so that others can learn from them. The first of these is by Gary Bargatze, the author of the Your Winding Daybreak Ways series. Following is his story of navigating the world of self-publishing.

 

How and Why I Self-Published Your Winding Daybreak Ways

 

By Gary Bargatze

 
When our first child was born some thirty years ago, a wise old friend foretold our future as parents.  He flashed a knowing smile and accurately predicted, “Children give you the greatest joy and the greatest sorrow…The challenges will never go away; they’ll just get different.”  And as writers who’ve “given birth” to a number of works over the years, my wife and I have often compared the ongoing challenges of parenting to the long, winding road of crafting an idea and managing it to print.

Guest Post: Thanksgiving Transition, by Walter F. Curran

This week The POP Newsletter presents the writing of Walter F. Curran, who submitted this essay in response to the writing prompt “Thanksgiving.” Many thanks to Walter for sharing his writing with us.

 

 

Walter_CurranThanksgiving Transition

Yeah, that’s right, transition, not tradition.
 
I am from South Boston, unavoidably, indelibly Irish. A few Lace Curtain types but mostly pig-shit Irish regularly ensconced on their corner pub thrones. A chronic forum for ridiculing the Lace Curtain Irish, claiming disdain but evincing envy. The Lace Curtains in turn behaved the same toward the Boston Brahmins. No one happy being themselves. Only the Irish!