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self-publishing

Learning from My Clients: Lessons in Publishing Success

In the blog series Publishing Stories, I asked several past clients to share their experiences with publishing.
  
There are more to come, but I would like to pause here and think about what we as authors, editors, and publishers can learn from their stories.
  
The four profiled authors — Gary Bargatze, W.K. Dwyer, Maureen C. Berry, and Peter C. Diamond — come from a variety of backgrounds, wrote on wide-ranging topics in both fiction and nonfiction, and were in varying stages of their careers as authors.

Publishing Stories: Author Maureen C. Berry on Publishing “Salmon from Market to Plate”

Maureen C. Berry, author of the cookbook Salmon from Market to Plate, is the feature of this month’s Publishing Stories installment. In this post she tells her experience with a traditional publisher and the ultimate successes she found for her book.

 

My Flirtation with Traditional Publishing

by Maureen C. Berry

 
You write and polish the best manuscript you can. You hire an editor. You research and then query an agent (or ten). Then wait. While you wait, you wring your hands, fret over that last phrase, that one word.
 
salmon-cover-200Should I have written more? Less? Did I seem needy? Will they like my work? OMG, did I include my phone number? I suck! What if I never hear from any of the agents? Should I self-publish? Traditional publishing is overrated. I will not self-publish, I’ll wait until I hear back. (Checks email every two minutes.) A rejection letter is better than nothing, right? A badge of honor. Surely someone will love my book.

Publishing Stories: Author W.K. Dwyer on Self-Publishing “The Killing Flower”

Welcome to the second installment of Publishing Stories, a new series from The POP Newsletter in which former POP Editorial Services clients offer publishing lessons for new authors. Today W.K. Dwyer shares his experience in publishing his newly released social science fiction novel, The Killing Flower.     Publishing a Book I Can Stand Behind   by W.K. Dwyer   In mid-October of 2016 I launched my debut novel, The Killing Flower. After more than seven years of writing, followed by two full years of editing, I held a launch party in DC, during which I referred to self-publishing as a misnomer, giving huge credit to the outstanding team I’d worked with, without whom I never would have completed my novel. Now that I’m on the other side, I want to share some of the details of this...

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Publishing Stories: Author Gary Bargatze on Self-Publishing “Your Winding Daybreak Ways”

In Publishing Stories, a new series from The POP Newsletter, I have asked former clients to share their publishing experience so that others can learn from them. The first of these is by Gary Bargatze, the author of the Your Winding Daybreak Ways series. Following is his story of navigating the world of self-publishing.

 

How and Why I Self-Published Your Winding Daybreak Ways

 

By Gary Bargatze

 
When our first child was born some thirty years ago, a wise old friend foretold our future as parents.  He flashed a knowing smile and accurately predicted, “Children give you the greatest joy and the greatest sorrow…The challenges will never go away; they’ll just get different.”  And as writers who’ve “given birth” to a number of works over the years, my wife and I have often compared the ongoing challenges of parenting to the long, winding road of crafting an idea and managing it to print.

Red Flags When Hiring a Copyeditor

Credit: Thinkstock

Credit: Thinkstock

 

I have written extensively about how to find and hire a copyeditor that is right for you. In the blog series How to Hire an Editor in 5 Easy Steps I discuss what to look for so you know you are hiring a qualified editor and the one who is best suited to you and your book. In this post I discuss the other side, the red flags.
 

Danger

Perhaps the biggest red flag to look for is someone who makes promises they can’t possibly keep. I recently came across this bold statement on an editor’s website:

Would You Take Back a Manuscript Before Your Editor Finished Working on It?

Several times throughout my freelance career, I have had reason to suggest an author take back a manuscript and work on it some more before I continue with my editing. The reactions I have received run the gamut.   The first time this came up, I had been hired for a developmental edit and project management. I had done plenty of project management but was new to manuscript development, and it wasn't until I had put in about 10 hours of work that I realized the project really amounted to a ghostwriting assignment.   Ghostwriting costs a lot of money for a number of reasons, the two most obvious being it takes a lot of skill and it takes a lot of time. It definitely costs more than development. With my client's pocketbook in mind,...

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10 Key Questions for Evaluating Your Book’s Competition

So much invaluable information about what is and is not already available, what the industry conventions are, and how you can make your book better than anything else on the market, can be gleaned from the competing titles in your area of writing. This is part of the planning that goes into creating a high-quality book.   Nevertheless, researching the competition can be overwhelming. As you sort through Amazon listings, print editions, and ebooks, you may begin to ask yourself, "What is it I'm  looking for again?" The following 10 key questions will help you remain focused while you evaluate your competition.   1. How does the author’s writing style compare to yours? This doesn't have to be a question of whose writing style is better -- although that can be a factor. The point...

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Lightning Source vs. CreateSpace: What I Would Do Differently

Updated February 28, 2015 Lightning Source Inc. (part of Ingram Content Group) and Create Space (part of Amazon) are the two most prominent options for print-on-demand in the United States. They are each enormous and come with their own pros and cons, making it difficult for self-publishers to choose between them.* vs.   For my book, I went through Lightning Source because the print and binding quality are said to be better, you can set your discount rates, you are automatically listed with Ingram's distribution (good if you want to be in bookstores), and further, I am not a fan of Amazon's business practices.   But I was asked recently, if I were to choose a print-on-demand option for my book today, would I do anything different from just a year ago when Perfect Bound...

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Copyright Tips and Tidbits: How and When to Register, How to Format Your Notice, and What Not to Do

Self-publishers, take note: While it’s true that you hold an inherent copyright to your work just for the fact that you wrote it, should anyone try to infringe on your copyright you will be best served by registering with the US Copyright Office (www.copyright.gov). That may sound intimidating, but it is actually a fairly straightforward process.   How to Register Start by going to the US Copyright Office website. The Copyright Office accepts both online and paper applications, and the applications come with easy-to-understand instructions. The filing fee (as of 2015) is $35 for online registration and $85 for hard copy.   In addition to the application and the filing fee, you will be asked to provide a copy of the “deposit” -- what the Copyright Office calls the work to be registered. If you...

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