POP Editorial Services LLC | The POP Newsletter, the blog home of POP Editorial Services, LLC and Katherine Pickett
blog, editing, publishing, tips, books, writing
85221
blog,paged,paged-7,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,select-theme-ver-1.8,vertical_menu_enabled, vertical_menu_width_400,side_menu_slide_from_right,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.12,vc_responsive
 

The PoP Newsletter

Road to Publication: The Design Process

UPDATE--May 15, 2014   We have a final cover!   [caption id="attachment_1018" align="alignnone" width="275"] The final front cover with endorsement[/caption]   Originally published April 29, 2014 If you'll recall, I left off last time having successfully navigated the copyediting stage of book production. For four weeks the manuscript for Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro had been with the copyeditor, which was a welcome break from the revisions I had been doing. However, I wasn't completely off the hook. The book still demanded much of my attention.   The same day I sent the manuscript to the copyeditor, I sent another copy of it to the designer. I had hired a woman I have worked with in the past on other books (not my own).  From that experience, I knew she had done...

Read More

Road to Publication: Copyediting

Oh my! So much has happened in the life of Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro in just the last four weeks.   For one thing, we have chosen the final title (see above). Phew! I'm happy to have that figured out.   More important, however, the manuscript has gone through the copyediting and design processes. I'll tell you all about design in the next post. Continue reading below to find out what it's like to have your manuscript professionally edited.   Everyone Needs an Editor   If you have good writing and editing skills, it's tempting to think you don't need a copyeditor. If you already know the rules, why not just do it yourself? I'll tell you why: you are too close to your work to see all of the errors....

Read More

Why a Sample Edit Should Be Cheap or Free

OK, everyone. Get ready for a rant.   I have recently come across several editors who charge for sample edits, with some charging more than $100 for a ten-page sample. One woman said outright, "I do nothing for free."   I respectfully disagree with that approach. Why? Because the sample edit is as much a tool for the editor as it is for the writer.   A ten-page sample edit might take two hours. To give that away for free is the same as handing over between $50 and $100, depending on the editor's rates. But is that so much to give up when a project could garner the editor $1,500-$3,000? Before paying for a sample edit, writers should understand that the editor is trying to get their business. They should also know that the editor...

Read More

How I Chose My Path to Publication

Self-publishing isn't right for every person or every book. It is, however, right for me. Here's how I made my decision.   Like many people, I started by assessing my strengths in relation to the requirements of traditional publishing.   I previously posted a brief quiz to help authors assess their strengths and weaknesses and consider how those factor into a decision about the right publishing path. Those same ten questions are what helped me decide my own route to publication.   My Quiz Responses 1. Do you have at least $5,000 that you can dedicate to your book project? Yes   2. Do you want complete creative control regarding the text, layout, and cover design of your book? That's not essential but it would be nice.   3. Do you have unquestionable credentials in your field, such as a degree or many...

Read More

Don’t be “scared.” They’re only scare quotes.

Are you ready for some "fun"?   Here, have some "free" chips.   These are "delicious"!   Have you ever noticed someone using quotation marks like this? Some writers seem to pepper their documents with quote marks, leaving their readers baffled at all the hidden meanings. There is a name for this type of punctuation. They are called scare quotes, and they are used to put the reader on alert that a different meaning is intended from what is commonly understood by a word. They are especially handy for indicating skepticism or irony.   When quote marks are used this way, it's as if the writer has inserted so-called before the word. The reader stops and considers what else that word could mean. For example:   The "hero" who showed up at the crime scene turned out to be the...

Read More

Road to Publication: Manuscript Development

My book project Perfect Bound: How to Publish a High-Quality Book That Sells (previously Manuscript to Book: How to Avoid the Potholes on the Road to Publication) has recently undergone a major shakeup. That is part and parcel for the manuscript development stage. It's an exciting time! After taking the book apart and putting it back together in a new format, I now have a structure that is tight, dynamic, and compelling.   How did this happen?   After some consideration, I decided to enlist the help of beta readers. I could have hired a developmental editor and saved time. However, by using beta readers, I was able to save a fair amount of money. I felt this was the right option for me because I knew most of the pieces of the book...

Read More

The Road to Publication

For the past year I have been writing a book about how to publish a book well. In Perfect Bound: How to Publish a High-Quality Book That Sells (formerly Manuscript to Book: How to Avoid the Potholes on the Road to Publication) I take the reader through the entire book publishing process, one step at a time, highlighting the common pitfalls that authors fall victim to at each stage and offering practical guidance on how to avoid them.   As I embark on this same path that the book describes, I invite you to share in the journey. At each phase of book production I will detail what is happening to the manuscript and where it is in its transformation into a book.   If you, too, are hoping to publish a book, these...

Read More

Where Does That Saying Come From? 3 Offensive Phrases You May Be Using

This football season the Washington Redskins have once again been urged to change their name. Although the team name is generally recognized to be a racial slur, the owner has thus far refused to replace it.   In 2011 it surfaced that Texas Gov. Rick Perry leased property at a camp commonly called "Niggerhead," of all things. The rock bearing the epithet was painted over, but the name lingers.   Both "redskin" and "niggerhead" are relics of a time when popular white society found racial slurs acceptable. Names like these tend to stay around because people are used to them and no longer question their origins. Such an attitude is problematic, however, because when offensive phrases become a part of our daily language we lose our sensitivity to the often deplorable history behind them.   Here...

Read More

Quiz: 10 Questions to Help You Choose Your Route to Publication

As an aspiring author you have several options for how to get published. The two most popular are through a traditional publishing house and self-publishing.   Three other routes also offer viable ways to have your work published. You could partner with an organization or business, you could write on a work-for-hire basis, or you could use a publishing service, where you pay a company to shepherd your manuscript through the book production process.   Each of these paths comes with its own demands and requirements of the author. By assessing your own strengths and weaknesses, you can find the route to publication that fits you best. Take this 10-question quiz to get started.   Do you have at least $5,000 that you can dedicate to your book project? Do you want complete creative control regarding the...

Read More

Cutting Ties with a Publisher

[caption id="attachment_708" align="alignright" width="150"] Courtesy of douceurs d'etre.[/caption] Because nonfiction books are often acquired before the manuscript is complete, sometimes it happens that the manuscript turned in to the publisher is not fit for publication.   Although it is rare, I have twice copyedited projects that were later canceled because the manuscript was submitted in such a state that it was deemed unacceptable.   In one case, the sentences simply did not make sense when put together in a paragraph. There’s no other way to describe it. I alerted the publisher of the problem, the managing editor reviewed the manuscript, and when it was determined that the book was not salvageable, it was canceled outright.   In another case, I was tasked with cutting 30,000 words—a quarter of the manuscript—in order to weed out the tangents and...

Read More

Error. Page cannot be displayed. Please contact your service provider for more details. (2)